Ending Child Abuse takes a Team Effort

We're here to help

The Children’s Justice Center is a team of professionals from different agencies and organizations that respond as a coordinated team when child abuse is reported in King County, Washington.

Ending Child Abuse takes a Team Effort

We're here to help

The Children’s Justice Center (CJC) is a team of professionals from different agencies and organizations that respond as a coordinated team when child abuse is reported in King County, Washington.

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How We Help

Safety

Safety

The first priority of the CJC is to address immediate safety needs of children when abuse is reported.

Healing

Healing

The CJC team connects children and their caregivers to the support they need and deserve.

Justice

Justice

The agencies and organizations of the CJC work as a coordinated team to hold offenders accountable and promote the safety and well-being of all children.

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About

The Children’s Justice Center of King County is one of 700 nationally accredited Children’s Advocacy Centers throughout the United States. The Children’s Justice Center was created to enhance team-work and collaboration in ensuring safety for children, healing for victims, and justice for the community in cases of child sexual and physical abuse. The goal of this collaborative approach is to offer support and healing services for child victims and their families while streamlining the process of reporting, investigating, and responding to concerns of child abuse. By working together, our community is better served and our children are better protected.

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Under the guidance of former King County Prosecutor Norm Maleng, the many agencies that respond to child sexual and physical abuse in King County began coordinating their efforts and services in the 1980’s. In 2010, King County formalized the working relationship between these agencies by creating the Children’s Justice Center of King County and in 2011 was accredited by the National Children’s Alliance. While the partner agencies are currently not housed together at a single-site, they work closely together to provide a coordinated community response to child sexual and physical abuse. The Children’s Justice Center serves over 1000 children and their families each year.

Who We Are

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The Children's Justice Center

When a child is harmed, many different people, from police officers to counselors, spring into action, and there are a lot of resources available to support that child and their family or guardians. Sometimes it can be confusing and even overwhelming to understand where to go and what will happen next.

Here in King County, the CJC is here to help children and families navigate this process and ensure they get the care and protection they need.

We coordinate work between the key agencies that respond when child abuse is reported. For 20 years, we have been helping victims, families and the community by organizing effective responses to cases involving physical and sexual abuse of children.

Police

When do the police become involved in a case?

The police become involved when there is a report of a possible crime. There are 26 police agencies in King County and each one investigates crimes that may have occurred in the area that they cover.

What will the police do if they become involved in my case?

In cases of reported child sexual or physical abuse, the police department will assign a detective who has received specialized training to collect information about the reported crime. This usually involves interviewing the reported victim of the crime, the person who is accused of the crime, as well as anybody else that may have information about what happened. The detective may also take items or photos that are important in the investigation of the crime. When the detective completes the investigation they turn their case into the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office. It is the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office that decides whether criminal charges will be filed.

How do I report to the police that a child is being abused?

If the child is in immediate danger or if an urgent police response is needed, call 9-1-1. In all other cases, please contact the police agency where the crime occurred.

Child Protective Services (CPS)

When does Child Protective Services (CPS) become involved with a family?

Child Protective Services takes reports from citizens and professionals about possible child abuse. The mission of CPS is to make sure that children are safe in their homes or in facilities licensed by the state. CPS becomes involved when the suspect is a parent, is acting in the parent-role, or is a sibling of the victim. CPS may also become involved if a parent does not protect their child from abuse or does not take steps to protect their child once the abuse becomes known. CPS also investigates cases when possible abuse is reported in a child care facility, foster home, or other state licensed facility.

What will CPS do with my family?

The focus of CPS is child safety. To keep children safe CPS social workers may create a safety plan with you. In addition, they may ask the identified suspect to leave your home during the investigation. If children cannot be kept safe in their home they may be temporarily placed with relatives or in a foster home until the home is safe again. CPS can also provide resources to help your family and they can help you understand the investigation process.

How do I contact CPS?

If you already have an assigned CPS social worker, you should contact your social worker with any questions or concerns about your case. If you want to report child abuse or neglect, contact CPS at 1-866-ENDHARM (1-866-363-4276).

Attorney General's Office

What is the Attorney General’s Office?

The Attorney General’s Office is the chief legal office for the State of Washington. Their attorneys provide legal representation for Child Protective Services and all of the Department of Social and Health Services.

When does the Attorney General’s Office become involved?

The Attorney General’s Office becomes involved when CPS has decided that they must remove a child from their home in order to keep the child safe. They continue to be involved as long as the child remains out of the home or is in an on-going dependency.

Medical Care

Does my child need a medical exam?

An immediate medical exam is recommended if a child under 12 years old reports that sexual abuse occurred within the past 72 hours (3 days) or a youth over 12 years old reports that a sexual assault occurred within the past 120 hours (5 days). A non-emergency medical exam is also generally recommended when there has been a report or concern of sexual abuse or anytime there is worry about the health of the child or teen. An exam is also recommended if a child has visible injuries or concern of recent or recurrent physical abuse.

Where can my child get a medical exam?

King County has a coordinated system that provides forensic medical care for all sexual assault victims. Harborview and Seattle Children’s Hospital Emergency Departments are the preferred hospitals for providing emergency medical exams for children. Several other hospitals also offer forensic medical exams to teens including Evergreen, Swedish First Hill, and Overlake. The UW Medicine Hospitals (UW Medical Center, Valley General and Northwest) refer all sexual assault patients to Harborview.

At all of these sites Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANEs) conduct the examinations. SANEs are specially trained nurses who come into the emergency department to provide sensitive and expert forensic exams and health care. Children and teens may also be scheduled for non-emergency exams at the Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress (HCSATS) at 206-744-1600.

How do I arrange for my child to have a medical exam?

To speak with a professional about whether an emergency medical exam is needed for your child, call Harborview Medical Center at 206-744-1600 or Seattle Children’s Hospital at 206-987-2194. Your teen can be seen at either of these hospitals or at one of the other hospitals that offer SANE examinations.

To schedule a non-emergency medical exam for your child, contact Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress (HCSATS) at 206-744-1600.

There are child abuse doctors and nurses on call at Harborview and Seattle Children’s Hospital 24 hours a day.

Child Interview

What is a child interview?

A child interview is a conversation with a child about what they may have experienced or witnessed. The information is gathered using evidence-based interviewing techniques that are designed to get accurate information from the child. The entire interviewing process is child-friendly and sensitive to each child’s development.

When does a child interview take place?

A child interview is scheduled after a detective is assigned to investigate a possible crime that involves a child between the ages of 4 through 11. Child interviews are also sometimes used with youth and adults who have special needs.

Where can I get more information about the interview process and how best to support my child?

The CJC has put together a pamphlet to answer the questions that most parents have about the process. The pamphlet is currently available in English, Spanish, and Somali.

King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office

The King County Prosecutors Office has two Special Assault Units, one at the King County Courthouse in Seattle and the other at the Maleng Regional Justice Center in Kent. Prosecutors who have special training and an interest in working on child abuse and sexual assault cases staff these units.

What does the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office do?

The Prosecuting Attorney’s Office is responsible for reviewing all cases that are turned in by law enforcement for possible criminal charges. After reviewing the case, the Prosecutor’s Office makes a legal decision about whether or not to file criminal charges.

As the victim of the crime, will the Prosecutor’s Office listen to me?

The Prosecutor’s Office welcomes and values input from victims and their families and you will have an opportunity to tell the Prosecutor’s Office what you would like to happen. The Prosecutor’s Office also understands that this can be a difficult and confusing process for children and they offer two special programs to prepare child victims and witness for potential court hearings – Kids’ Court and Teen Court.

What is Kid’s Court?

Kid’s Court is an activity-based court awareness program for children ages 4-12. It is designed to help children and families cope with the process of going to court. Kids’ Court is held at least 4 times a year on a Saturday morning. While your child attends the Kid’s Court Program, parents and caregivers attend a separate program that is designed to address their needs and answer their questions about what will happen and how to best support their child throughout the process.

What is Teen Court?

Teen Court is an activity-based court awareness program that is held several times a year on a Saturday morning. Teen Court is designed to address the questions and concerns that are unique to teenage girls who have been victims of crimes.

How can I sign my child up to attend Kids’/Teen Court?

Your assigned legal advocate will discuss whether Kids’ or Teen Court is appropriate for you and your child.

Crisis Response & Counseling Services

I need to talk to someone. Who can I call?

The King County Sexual Assault Resource Center (KCSARC) crisis line is available 24 hours a day/seven days a week (1-888-99-VOICE/1-888-998-6423). Harborview provides 24 hours a day/seven days a week access directly to the Emergency Department (206-744-1600). These resources offer crisis support and guidance.

How do I know if my child or I need counseling?

Not all children need formal counseling. In some cases support, information and guidance can be enough. For other children, youth, and families, trauma-specific counseling will be most helpful. The way to find out what would be best for your child and family is to meet with a professional who has specialized training in assessing and treating the impact of trauma. Specialists can be reached at the King County Sexual Assault Resource Center (KCSARC) or Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress (HCSATS).

Counseling services at Harborview (HCSATS) and the King County Sexual Assault Resource Center (KCSARC) include:
- support
- crisis response
- information about trauma, its impact, and the systems victims and families encounter
- tips for managing victim’s responses
- assistance with accessing other community services
- evidence-based trauma-specific counseling.

What is involved in trauma-counseling?

You and your counselor work together to create a treatment plan based on the results of an assessment. The goal of trauma-counseling is to lower children’s symptoms, help caregivers support their children, and get children and youth back on track. This form of counseling is structured and focused and most clients complete therapy within 16-20 sessions.

Partner Services

Child Protective Services (DSHS)arrow
Law Enforcement (Police)arrow
Medical Carearrow
Legal Advocacyarrow
King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office & Child Interviewarrow
Attorney General of Washington Statearrow
Mental Health & Counseling Servicesarrow

Child Protective Services
Website
1-866-END-HARM

Algona Police Department
Website
402 Warde St
Algona, WA 98001
(253) 833-2743

Auburn Police Department
Website
340 East Main Street, Ste. 201
Auburn, WA 98002
(253) 931-3080

Bellevue Police Department
Website
Crimes Against Persons Unit
450 110th Ave NE
Bellevue, WA 98009-9012
(425) 452-6917

Black Diamond Police Department
Website
25510 Lawston St
Black Diamond, WA 98010
(253) 631-1012

Bothell Police Department
Website
18410 101 Ave NE
Bothell, WA 98011
(425) 486-1254

Clyde Hill Police Department (including Yarrow Point)
Website
9605 NE 24th St
Clyde Hill, WA 98004
(425) 454-7187

Des Moines Police Department
Website
21900 11th Ave S
Des Moines, WA 98198
(206) 878-3301

Duvall Police Department
Website
26225 Stephens St NE
Duvall, WA 98019
(425) 788-1519

Enumclaw Police Department
Website
1705 Wells St.
Enumclaw, WA 98022
(360) 825-3505

Federal Way Police Department
Website
33325 8th Ave South
PO Box 9718 Federal Way, WA 98063-9718
(253) 835-6700

Issaquah Police Department
Website
130 E. Sunset Way
Issaquah, WA 98027
(425) 837-3200

Kent Police Department
Website
220 4th Ave S
Kent, WA 98032
(253) 856-5800

King County Sheriff's Office (unincorporated King County, Beaux Arts, Burien, Carnation, Covington, Kenmore, Maple Valley, Muckleshoot, Newcastle, Sammamish, SeaTac, Shoreline, Woodinville)
Website
Special Assault Unit
King County Administration Building
500 4th Ave, 2nd floor
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 263-2110

Kirkland Police Department
Website
123 5th Ave
Kirkland, WA 98033
(425) 577-5656

Lake Forest Park Police Department
Website
17425 Ballinger Way NE
Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
(206) 364-8216

Medina Police Department (including Hunts Point)
Website
501 Evergreen Pt. Rd.
Medina, WA 98039
(425) 454-1332

Mercer Island Police Department
Website
9600 SE 36th St
Mercer Island, WA 98040
(206) 275-7610

Normandy Park Police Department
Website
801 SW 174 St
Normandy Park, WA 98166
(206) 248-7600

Pacific Police Department
Website
133 Third Ave SE
Pacific, WA 98047
(253) 833-8486

Redmond Police Department
Website
8701 160th Ave NE
Redmond, WA 98073
(425) 556-2500

Renton Police Department
Website
1055 S Grady Way
Renton, WA 98055
(425) 430-7500

Seattle Police Department
Website
Sexual Assault and Child Abuse Unit
601 5th Ave
Seattle, WA 98124-4986
(206) 684-5575

Snoqualmie Police Departmentt
Website
34825 SE Douglas Street
Snoqualmie, WA 98065
(425) 888-3333

Tukwila Police Department
Website
6200 Southcenter Blvd
Tukwila, WA 98188
(206) 433-1808

University of Washington Police
Website
1117 NE Boat Street
Seattle, WA 98105
(206) 543-0507

Seattle Children’s Hospital
Website
Protection Program
(8:00 am - 4:30 pm, Mon.-Fri., excluding holidays)
4800 Sand Point Way NE
Seattle, WA 98105
206-987-2194

Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress (HCSATS)
Website
401 Broadway, Suite 2075
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 744-1600

Swedish Medical Center
Website
5300 Tallman Ave NW
Seattle, WA 98107
(206) 782-2700

King County Sexual Assault Resource Center (KCSARC)
Website
200 Mill Ave S
Renton, WA 98057
(425) 226-5062
24 hour Sexual Assault resource line:
1-888-99-VOICE (1-888-998-6423)

Seattle Police Department Victim Advocates (for cases being investigated by the Seattle Police Department)
Website
610 5th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98124-4986
(206) 684-5575

King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office & Child Interview
Website

Seattle Office – King County Courthouse
516 Third Avenue, 5th Floor
Seattle, WA 98104-2362
(206) 477-3742

Kent Office – Maleng Regional Justice Center
401 4th Ave N – Suite 2A
Kent, WA 98030
(206) 205-7400

Attorney General of Washington State
Website
800 5th Ave, Suite 2000
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 464-7045

King County Sexual Assault Resource Center (KCSARC)
Website
200 Mill Avenue South, Suite 10
Renton, WA 98057
(425) 226-5062
24 hour Sexual Assault resource line:
1-888-99-VOICE (1-888-998-6423)

Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress (HCSATS)
Website
401 Broadway, Suite 2075
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 744-1600

Partner Services

Child Protective Services (DSHS)

Child Protective Services
Website
1-866-END-HARM

Law Enforcement (Police)

Algona Police Department
Website
402 Warde St
Algona, WA 98001
(253) 833-2743

Auburn Police Department
Website
340 East Main Street, Ste. 201
Auburn, WA 98002
(253) 931-3080

Bellevue Police Department
Website
Crimes Against Persons Unit
450 110th Ave NE
Bellevue, WA 98009-9012
(425) 452-6917

Black Diamond Police Department
Website
25510 Lawston St
Black Diamond, WA 98010
(253) 631-1012

Bothell Police Department
Website
18410 101 Ave NE
Bothell, WA 98011
(425) 4867-1254

Clyde Hill Police Department (including Yarrow Point)
Website
9605 NE 24th St
Clyde Hill, WA 98004
(425) 454-7187

Des Moines Police Department
Website
21900 11th Ave S
Des Moines, WA 98198
(206) 878-3301

Duvall Police Department
Website
26225 Stephens St NE
Duvall, WA 98019
(425) 788-1519

Enumclaw Police Department
Website
1705 Wells St.
Enumclaw, WA 98022
(360) 825-3505

Federal Way Police Department
Website
33325 8th Ave South
PO Box 9718 Federal Way, WA 98063-9718
(253) 835-6700

Issaquah Police Department
Website
130 E. Sunset Way
Issaquah, WA 98027
(425) 837-3200

Kent Police Department
Website
220 4th Ave S
Kent, WA 98032
(253) 856-5800

King County Sheriff's Office (unincorporated King County, Burien, Carnation, Covington, Kenmore, Maple Valley, Newcastle, Sammamish, SeaTac, Shoreline, Woodinville)
Website
Special Assault Unit
King County Administration Building
500 4th Ave, 2nd floor
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 263-2110

Kirkland Police Department
Website
123 5th Ave
Kirkland, WA 98033
(425) 577-5656

Lake Forest Park Police Department
Website
17425 Ballinger Way NE
Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
(206) 364-8216

Medina Police Department (including Hunts Point)
Website
501 Evergreen Pt. Rd.
Medina, WA 98039
(425) 454-1332

Mercer Island Police Department
Website
9600 SE 36th St
Mercer Island, WA 98040
(206) 275-7610

Normandy Park Police Department
Website
801 SW 174 St
Normandy Park, WA 98166
(206) 248-7600

Pacific Police Department
Website
133 Third Ave SE
Pacific, WA 98047
(253) 833-8486

Redmond Police Department
Website
8701 160th Ave NE
Redmond, WA 98073
(425) 556-2500

Renton Police Department
Website
1055 S Grady Way
Renton, WA 98055
(425) 430-7500

Seattle Police Department
Website
Sexual Assault and Child Abuse Unit
601 5th Ave
Seattle, WA 98124-4986
(206) 684-5575

Tukwila Police Department
Website
6200 Southcenter Blvd
Tukwila, WA 98188
(206) 433-1808

University of Washington Police
Website
1117 NE Boat Street
Seattle, WA 98105
(206) 543-0507

Medical Care

Seattle Children’s Hospital
Website
Protection Program
(8:00 am - 4:30 pm, Mon.-Fri., excluding holidays)
4800 Sand Point Way NE
Seattle, WA 98105
206-987-2194

Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress (HCSATS)
Website
401 Broadway, Suite 2075
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 744-1600

Swedish Medical Center
Website
5300 Tallman Ave NW
Seattle, WA 98107
(206) 782-2700

Legal Advocacy

King County Sexual Assault Resource Center (KCSARC)
Website
200 Mill Ave S
Renton, WA 98057
(425) 226-5062
24 hour Sexual Assault resource line:
1-888-99-VOICE (1-888-998-6423)

Seattle Police Department Victim Advocates (for cases being investigated by the Seattle Police Department)
Website
610 5th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98124-4986
(206) 684-5575

King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office & Child Interview

Website

Seattle Office – King County Courthouse
516 Third Avenue, 5th Floor
Seattle, WA 98104-2362
(206) 477-37420

Kent Office – Maleng Regional Justice Center
401 4th Ave N – Suite 2A
Kent, WA 98030
(206) 205-7400

Attorney General of Washington State

Website
800 5th Ave, Suite 2000
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 464-7045

Mental Health & Counseling Services

King County Sexual Assault Resource Center (KCSARC)
Website
200 Mill Avenue South, Suite 10
Renton, WA 98057
(425) 226-5062
24 hour Sexual Assault resource line:
1-888-99-VOICE (1-888-998-6423)

Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress (HCSATS)
Website
401 Broadway, Suite 2075
Seattle, WA 98104
(206) 744-1600

FAQ's

What is child abuse?

“Child Abuse” refers to sexual abuse, sexual exploitation, physical injury of a child, or neglect of a child that presents a danger to the child’s health, welfare, or safety. The Washington State laws about what is and is not abuse can be found here.

If you have a question about whether something is child abuse, it’s best to speak to a trained professional about what you’ve seen or heard by calling Child Protective Services at 1-800-ENDHARM.

What should I do if a child tells me that they’re being abused?

The most important thing you can do is to remain calm and neutral and listen to the child. Pay close attention to what the child says but don’t ask for all of the details about what took place. Allow the child to tell you what happened in their own words and assure them that they’re not in trouble. It’s important to then tell CPS and/or the police about what the child reported so that they can conduct a thorough investigation.

Do I have to report abuse?

According to Washington State law, certain professionals are considered “mandated reporters” and they are required to report their concerns to CPS and/or the police when they believe that a child is being harmed. Mandated reporters include police, nurses, counselors, CASAs/GALs, child care providers, teachers, and many other professionals. For a complete list, please see the Washington State Legislature website. Also, it’s important to remember that whether you are required by state law to report abuse or not, it is everyone’s responsibility to speak up for children when they are being harmed.

What if I’m not sure if a child is being abused?

It’s not your responsibility to prove whether or not a child is being abused. Rather, it’s your responsibility to report any reasonable concern of abuse to Child Protective Services and/or the police. If you suspect that a child is being abused, call 1-800-ENDHARM. If an immediate police response is needed, call 9-1-1.

What happens when the abuse is reported to the police?

Usually a report is taken and the case is assigned to a detective who has received specialized training in investigating these types of crimes. The case will be investigated by the law enforcement agency responsible for the location where the crime occurred. The detective investigates the possible crime by collecting information from the child, the person who is accused of the crime, as well as anyone else that may have information about what might have happened. The police may take photos or possession of items that they believe are important in the investigation of the crime. The police may also refer some children to medical services for an examination. Additionally, advocacy services are offered to children and their care providers during the investigation. When the investigation is complete the detective turns the case into the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office and it is the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office that decides whether or not to file criminal charges.

What will happen when the abuse is reported to Child Protective Services?

First, a social worker will decide whether the case is appropriate for Child Protective Services. CPS only accepts cases where the suspect is a parent, is acting in the role of a parent, or the child is potentially in danger because of something or someone in the home. If the case does not fit into one of these categories CPS will not assign a CPS social worker.

If a CPS social worker is assigned they will often begin by assessing the safety of the child by speaking with the child. They will also speak with the parents/guardians of the child, the person who is accused of harming the child, and anyone else who may have information about the care of the child. Based on the information that CPS collects, they will work with the family to ensure the on-going safety and well-being of the child.

Will Child Protective Services take my child away from me?

The primary concern of Child Protective Services is the safety of the child and there are many ways to make sure that a child is safe. CPS may work with you to create a safety plan or they may ask the identified suspect to leave the home during the investigation. If children cannot be kept safe in their home CPS may ask that the child be temporarily removed from their parent’s care, but CPS works hard to avoid this option and it’s important that you work closely with your CPS social worker to make sure that your child is safe.

Who can I call for support?

King County Sexual Assault Resource Center (KCSARC) operates a 24-hour crisis line and Harborview Medical Center provides 24-hour access to the Emergency Department. Both resources are staffed by professionals who can provide support and guidance. In addition, during the time your case is involved in the criminal justice system you will have access to a legal advocate who is specially trained on issues of child abuse and the criminal justice system. In addition to these supports, counseling resources are available throughout the community. Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress (HCSATS) and King County Sexual Assault Resource Center both offer counseling by highly trained clinical professionals who are very knowledgeable on issues of child abuse and sexual assault.

I was abused as a child, but am now an adult. What resources are available for me?

Regardless of when the abuse occurred, there are resources in our community that are available to help. King County Sexual Assault Resource Center operates a 24 hour crisis line to provide support and guidance. Both Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress (HCSATS) and King County Sexual Assault Resource Center (KCSARC) have staff available to talk with you to help you make a plan for counseling. If you have medical concerns relating to the past abuse, the medical staff at Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress is ready to consult with you to help determine the best plan for accessing the proper medical care you need.

Where is the Children’s Justice Center of King County?

At this point in time the Children’s Justice Center of King County is not physically located at a single-site. While each agency currently has their own location, the CJC team works closely together in responding to allegations of child abuse.

How many children does the Children’s Justice Center of King County serve each year?

The CJC provides services to over 1000 children each year.

Does the CJC only serve children who have been sexually assaulted?

No. Most of the children seen at the CJC are here because of concerns about sexual abuse, but the CJC also serves children who have been physically injured or have been witnesses to crime.

More FAQ's
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I was abused as a child, but am now an adult. What resources are available for me?

Regardless of when the abuse occurred, there are resources in our community that are available to help. King County Sexual Assault Resource Center operates a 24 hour crisis line to provide support and guidance. Both Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress (HCSATS) and King County Sexual Assault Resource Center (KCSARC) have staff available to talk with you to help you make a plan for counseling. If you have medical concerns relating to the past abuse, the medical staff at Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress is ready to consult with you to help determine the best plan for accessing the proper medical care you need.

Where is the Children’s Justice Center of King County?

At this point in time the Children’s Justice Center of King County is not physically located at a single-site. While each agency currently has their own location, the CJC team works closely together in responding to allegations of child abuse and ensuring that victim’s needs are met.

How many children does the CJC of King County serve each year?

The CJC provides services to over 1000 children each year.

Does the CJC only serve children who have been sexually assaulted?

No. The majority of cases involve allegations of sexual abuse but the CJC also serves children who have been physically injured or have been witnesses to crime.

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